©2019 Gold Hill Whitewater, Inc.

 Could We Host the 
2028 LA Olympic Games?

Los Angeles will host the Olympic Games in 2028 and has no whitewater. Meanwhile, we could soon have an Olympic slalom course designed by Rick McLaughlin, who designed the 1996 Olympic course on the Ocoee River, as well  Oliver Fix, who won the the 1996 Olympic Gold medal. Our natural whitewater course could save LA tens of millions of dollars and bring the Olympics to Oregon for the first time! (photo of Oliver and Rick on right)

As a first step to test the Olympic idea, Travel Medford invited Morgan House, Director of High Performance for the American Canoe Association, to visit Ti'lomikh Falls. The ACA is the governing body of Olympic slalom. Morgan toured the site with a group including Olympians Oliver Fix and Steve Kiesling, as well as Alex Campbell from the governor's Solution Team and Angela Wood from Travel Medford. Afterwards, the whitewater team went to Oliver's restaurant on the plaza in Ashland called Ostras (above). Morgan had kind words to say about our our new whitewater park as well as the new Adventure Center being built on Emigrant Lake. Our next step will likely be to invite representatives from the Los Angeles Olympic Committee to Ti'lomikh Falls.

Olympic_Day.jpg

The First Salmon Ceremony

 

In 2012, Olympic Day corresponded with the Salmon Ceremony, and so a team of Olympic athletes from 3 continents (Oliver Fix, Gilda Montenegro Fix, and Steve Kiesling) brought Grandma Aggie by raft to the Story Chair at the base of Ti'lomikh Falls. The Story Chair is the centerpiece of the ancient Takelma Salmon Ceremony. The Olympic flag was sent from the 2010 Olympics in Victoria, BC, by USA gold medallists Dick Fosbury and Norm Bellingham. 

    To see the Oregon Public Broacasting video of the 2013 Salmon Ceremony—as well scenes from  Grandma's epic voyage—click on the picture. Or click on the pdf to read the feature article in Spirituality & Health magazine called Bringing Grandma Home.

Coming Soon: Mountain Bike Trails!

The City of Gold Hill owns most of the hillside on Nugget Butte and has plans for hiking/mountain bike trails that will first create a loop from the Sports Park parking lot to the Ti'loimikh Falls parking lot. Future trails will connect for miles on adjacent BLM land. The trail system will be similar to the great Mountain of the Rogue trails outside the City of Rogue River. The Nugget Butte trails will be shaded from the afternoon summer sun and also will will have spectacular views of the river. The combination of Olympic class whitewater, rock climbing, and mountain biking with the best skateboard park in the Rogue Valley will be a destination for an enormous variety of athletes and their families.

Bringing Grandma Home Feature

Adding to the Skate Park

The Gold Hill Skate Park was rated #1 in the Rogue Valley by the Medford Mail Tribune even before the latest addition of a bowl. Coming soon is a spectator seating under a gazebo that's being funded and built by the Gold Hill Community Development Organization (Can Do!). The grand opening will be this summer.

 

KING OF THE ROGUE 

Saturday, July 13. 2019

Racers

Sign up on site at the Riverwalk Marketplace

Ti'loimikh Overlook. 996 Upper River Rd.

Spectators

Best viewing from the Riverwalk Marketplace

Bathing Suits and River Sandals for Inner Tubing

 

Vendors

Contact Lori Hettman

lorihettman@earthlink.net

Want to Volunteer?

Contact Steve@goldhillwhitewater.org.

Permitting The Park

A Draft Biological Assessment for the whitewater park has been completed and the results look very positive. The next step is to set up meetings with the regulatory agencies and tribes that will be involved in the permitting process. In the meantime, feel free to download the files. If you have comments or suggestions, please send them to Steve@goldhillwhitewater.org. 

Design Report

Draft Biological Assessment

Riparian Trails Plan

A Future for the Old Powerhouse

The old powerhouse building needs to cleaned up. The upper wooden structure has lead paint and asbestos—and is falling into the river. But the concrete base is sound and could be turned into a waterfront climbing wall with a seasonal open air restaurant on top. Whitewater and climbing go together naturally. This photo was taken at high water. There are concrete footings at the base of the wall for a walkway and climbing base.

Powerhouse EPA Brownfield Assessmemnt

The New Bowl!

Whitewater Design and Monument Placement

Proposed Indigenous Peoples Monument

National Park Service Trails Plan for Gold Hill 2004

Future of the Powerhouse

The old powerhouse building just downstream of Ti'lomikh could become a riverfront climbing wall and outdoor restaurant.